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When living and breathing your Brand becomes literal

May 20th, 2022 by

What is ‘Brand’? It’s so much more than a cleverly worded tagline or mission statement. It’s the lived and breathed experience at every touchpoint of your organisation. That includes obvious things like your communications, website, and the interactions your customers have with your staff. But there’s also a sometimes overlooked element: the environment in which you operate – your office space.

There are two parts to this. First, the experience your customers have when they visit your office – does it align with and speak of your brand and values? Secondly, less often considered, is the impact of your working environment on your personnel. At a time when employee diffidence with the idea of returning to the office is at an all-time high, it’s time to start creating the sort of environments that people want to spend time in.

We need to create spaces which give people something they could never replicate at home: spaces which encourage collaboration, connection and creativity. Spaces which reflect your brand values in a tangible, living, breathing way.

It’s unlikely that we will ever return to five days a week in the office environment. In fact there’s pretty compelling evidence that that is not the best outcome for employees, or their organisations. So there’s an opportunity here for organisations to embrace the notion that reduced square footage presents an opening to funnel funds towards creating spaces which, for the two or three days people are in the office, spark joy and stimulate productivity. Spaces which are human-centred and support wellbeing. Spaces that will allow your people to deliver on your brand purpose.

Future of work

Once again Google are leading the way with their latest Bay View campus. Google say the interior of the buildings reemphasize their vision for the future of work, designed in response to its understanding of why Google’s employees come to the office, what they need from their teammates, and what they need from the company. The campus incorporates biophilic design principles, including greenery, natural daylight and views outside from every desk to improve the health and wellbeing of those inside the building.

Authenticity

As Google demonstrates so well when they regularly canvassed their employees in the creation of their new campus, it’s vital to ensure that the spaces you create are aligned with your brand and your people. This will ensure that there is an authenticity to what is created.

To do this it’s essential to take the time to dive deeply into all the elements that make up your brand: to speak to all your stakeholders.; to layer that with what the wider market is doing; and then weave all the intel into a brief which speaks with such clarity of your brand that it creates an energy which feeds into all areas of your business.

It’s time to start creating workplaces of the future. It’s time to start listening.

 

Love and knowledge in the time of Covid

June 15th, 2020 by

There was a time when, for some, VUCA was a term which got tossed around as the mood took them, rather like a play thing – a colourful shiny ball – to throw around for a bit of amusement and then put away again, forgotten about as the busyness of everyday life crowded it out.

And then along came Covid – which slammed into us and showed us what VUCA really looked and felt like. It showed us that the ‘Unexpected’ was exactly that. And those who had just been playing were caught napping.

Companies who had truly understood what being prepared and ready in a VUCA world was all about, were ready to pivot, respond and adapt.

New ways of working do not happen without a grounded understanding of what you are

And what underlies that ability is a clear sense of organizational purpose and standing in the world. The ability to harness all your resources and know that the whole organization will be able to turn, as one, to embrace new ways of working does not happen without a grounded understanding of what you are: what you are internally; what you are externally; and from there, clarify and articulate a clear brand purpose.

Now, more than ever, companies need to understand that there has been a fundamental shift in business and consumerism and in the very nature of what it means to be a brand. This has been explained as ‘glass box’ vs ‘black box’ by the people at Trendwatching.com. In the past, companies appeared to outsiders as something of a black box – for outsiders, it was pretty hard to see what was going on inside. The brand that was visible to the outside world was whatever you put on the outside of the box.

Now, businesses are glass boxes. Outsiders can see inside: the people, the processes, the values. So when consumers look inside the glass box that is your brand, they need to like what they see.

Properly understanding the mood, values and drivers influencing their internal culture and, by extension, external brand has never been more important

However, for many businesses, properly understanding the mood, values and drivers influencing their internal culture and, by extension, external brand, is assumed, rather than regularly and carefully monitored and measured, missing out on the sort of valuable data which can be used to develop targeted and strategic change management processes.

Covid has radically altered so much. It would be impossible for any company to know, absolutely, what their staff and employees are currently feeling and expecting of the post-lockdown world. So many previously understood ‘non-negotiables’ around flexible working and remote team meetings have been turned on their heads. How many will want to return to the way things used to be? What will the aspects of our lockdown ways of working and operating will be people be quick to drop, and what will they want to hang on to?

Organisations who listen now and embrace a willingness to co-create a new way of working have the opportunity to build a new internal culture. And harnessing intelligence from within the organisation can illicit other unexpected insights which can inform new strategic directions – and, more importantly – foster a culture in which people feel heard and seen and from which powerful futures can be created.

Heidi Todd – Brand Illumination

If you would like to talk to us about conducting a stakeholder analysis or internal culture audit, please contact us on 0421 398778

Creating a Good Ending – When it’s time for someone to leave

November 30th, 2017 by

In a recent coaching session a CEO asked for advice about a tough, yet necessary conversation; it was time for a person in a leadership role to leave the business. The role had been important during a period of transition and the executive had contributed a great deal to the team and the business over the previous four years. At times the executive had been challenging and had been prepared to disrupt the status quo to create new awareness for the rapidly growing business. The CEO wanted to ensure that she and the organisation acknowledged the contribution this executive had made to the business, and that their season of working together was now at an end.

 

We discussed the idea of creating a ‘Good Ending’, which aligns with systemic principles that enhance flow within an organisation. A ‘Good Ending’ would be important for everyone – the CEO, the executive, the other leaders in the business and the staff – everyone would have an opinion and perspective on how well or how poorly it was managed. In preparation, the CEO mapped out some things she thought were important, and together we arrived at some principles to hold during the conversation and ensuing process. It would be important to be able to keep these principles top of mind while navigating what could have been a challenging conversation.

So what are the three principles for a Good Ending?

 

Brand Illumination – Good Ending Infograph

 

Setting up well

  • Be aware of your tone and attitude going into the meeting; choose your language and tone carefully.
  • Be prepared to listen: people often need to express their disappointment up front.  Give them some space to do that but hold clear and firm with your decision.
  • Even if they get a bit upset, don’t behave reactively and defend the decision
  • Be generous: everyone will be watching what happens and they will feel your generosity or lack of it.

 

Recognition / Acknowledgement

  • Ensure the person knows their contribution has been part of the organisation’s success.
  • Recognise what you have personally learnt in your time working together.
  • Acknowledge 2-3 specific things that have made a difference to the organisation and to you.

 

Good ending

  • Organise a social event with the team and others in the organisation at a time when most can attend.
  • Send an email to invite others to attend which includes some praise for the person’s contribution


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  • At the event, publicly acknowledge their contribution to the team and the organisation


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  • Give a meaningful gift as an expression of gratitude.

 

 

Why does it matter?

Every action is either creating or eroding brand value; the way someone leaves an organisation communicates a lot to everyone else.  When others see that you have managed the process with grace and equanimity, they feel safe and assured that people are valued here – that this brand cares about each individual and is prepared to acknowledge and celebrate that contribution.

Since the exit, I’ve had the chance to speak with the CEO and the executive – they tell a similar story of how well the exit went, how respectful and honouring it was, and that it was a positive experience all around.

If you would like help with creating a ‘Good Ending’ (or Beginning), a  ‘Successful Transition’ or with the cultural aspects of Succession Planning please email fiona@brandillumination.com.au

 

WRITTEN BY: FIONA PEARMAN & HEIDI TODD

Website Development – The power of collaboration

February 17th, 2016 by

During 2015, Brand Illumination partnered with our client, AltusQ (a network of senior business coaches operating in Australia and NZ) to build a new website. AltusQ wanted a site that would enable clients and prospective clients to learn more about their services, receive new information and ideas and encourage a sense of community for the coaches and their clients. Navigating a complicated site build for a company made up of strong individuals could have been tricky, without the collaborative model we used.

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Being who you are, is your authentic personal brand

October 31st, 2014 by

There are a lot of people talking about personal brand, but what exactly is it? And why is it important?

To some people, the idea of having a personal brand can be a little off-putting. It can feel superficial and some of the articles and tips on this subject provide instructions that are truly superficial. Pretending to be something you are not, will not serve your personal brand, it will create a horrible expectation to be someone you are not.

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Employee Engagement by Design Not Default

October 17th, 2013 by

Guest Blog – Kate Boorer

Thanks Kate for this blog on how organisations can evolve their thinking and management of employee engagement. Most brands rely on their employees to be enthused, professional and to deliver on their organisation’s brand promise. Engaged employees create better workplaces, are more productive, share the brand love and create great brand experiences for customers and other stakeholders.

Kate’s Nine-Step Engagement Ladder is a great framework for organisations who are under leveraging the potential of their people.

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We are all connected – Myer missed the point when they defended a social media backlash

June 7th, 2013 by

MyerThanks Laurel Papworth for this insightful blog & article in the Australian which inspired this blog.

Myer received a thrashing on social media in early May over the CEO’s negative comments regarding the introduction of the NDIS (National Disability Insurance Scheme) to better fund services for those in the community with disabilities. Bernie Brooks believed that it would impact discretionary spending, which would be bad for Myer’s business / profits.

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Why are Australians spending in Zara and TopShop yet not with our local brands?

February 13th, 2012 by

Online shopping is not the only reason our local brands are challenged.

Shopping in ZaraDecember 2011 was the opening of the first Topshop premises in Melbourne.  Hundreds of people waited in line, in the unpredictable Melbourne weather – some for over 17 hours, just to be first into the new Chapel Street store.  For their trouble the first 20 die-hard shoppers were awarded with a $100 voucher to be spent in Topshop.

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Being your brand – continually creating the magic

October 12th, 2010 by

Many organisations cite their employees as their most important asset. Most businesses know that to deliver the brand purpose at every touch-point, their people need to be inspired to make that happen. And it can’t be half-hearted or only happen sometimes – they need to be inspired to continually deliver on the brand purpose, day in and day out.

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