Love and knowledge in the time of Covid

There was a time when, for some, VUCA was a term which got tossed around as the mood took them, rather like a play thing – a colourful shiny ball – to throw around for a bit of amusement and then put away again, forgotten about as the busyness of everyday life crowded it out.

And then along came Covid – which slammed into us and showed us what VUCA really looked and felt like. It showed us that the ‘Unexpected’ was exactly that. And those who had just been playing were caught napping.

Companies who had truly understood what being prepared and ready in a VUCA world was all about, were ready to pivot, respond and adapt.

New ways of working do not happen without a grounded understanding of what you are

And what underlies that ability is a clear sense of organizational purpose and standing in the world. The ability to harness all your resources and know that the whole organization will be able to turn, as one, to embrace new ways of working does not happen without a grounded understanding of what you are: what you are internally; what you are externally; and from there, clarify and articulate a clear brand purpose.

Now, more than ever, companies need to understand that there has been a fundamental shift in business and consumerism and in the very nature of what it means to be a brand. This has been explained as ‘glass box’ vs ‘black box’ by the people at Trendwatching.com. In the past, companies appeared to outsiders as something of a black box – for outsiders, it was pretty hard to see what was going on inside. The brand that was visible to the outside world was whatever you put on the outside of the box.

Now, businesses are glass boxes. Outsiders can see inside: the people, the processes, the values. So when consumers look inside the glass box that is your brand, they need to like what they see.

Properly understanding the mood, values and drivers influencing their internal culture and, by extension, external brand has never been more important

However, for many businesses, properly understanding the mood, values and drivers influencing their internal culture and, by extension, external brand, is assumed, rather than regularly and carefully monitored and measured, missing out on the sort of valuable data which can be used to develop targeted and strategic change management processes.

Covid has radically altered so much. It would be impossible for any company to know, absolutely, what their staff and employees are currently feeling and expecting of the post-lockdown world. So many previously understood ‘non-negotiables’ around flexible working and remote team meetings have been turned on their heads. How many will want to return to the way things used to be? What will the aspects of our lockdown ways of working and operating will be people be quick to drop, and what will they want to hang on to?

Organisations who listen now and embrace a willingness to co-create a new way of working have the opportunity to build a new internal culture. And harnessing intelligence from within the organisation can illicit other unexpected insights which can inform new strategic directions – and, more importantly – foster a culture in which people feel heard and seen and from which powerful futures can be created.

Heidi Todd – Brand Illumination

If you would like to talk to us about conducting a stakeholder analysis or internal culture audit, please contact us on 0421 398778

We are all connected – Myer missed the point when they defended a social media backlash

MyerThanks Laurel Papworth for this insightful blog & article in the Australian which inspired this blog.

Myer received a thrashing on social media in early May over the CEO’s negative comments regarding the introduction of the NDIS (National Disability Insurance Scheme) to better fund services for those in the community with disabilities. Bernie Brooks believed that it would impact discretionary spending, which would be bad for Myer’s business / profits.

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